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Iiij - caboges


This is an excerpt from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books
(England, 1430)
The original source can be found at the University of Michigan's "Corpus of Middle English Prose and Verse"

iiij - Caboges. Take fayre caboges, an cutte hem, an pike hem clene and clene washe hem, an parboyle hem in fayre water, an thanne presse hem on a fayre bord; an than choppe hem, and caste hem in a faire pot with goode freysshe broth, an wyth mery-bonys, and let it boyle: thanne grate fayre brede and caste ther-to, an caste ther-to Safron an salt; or ellys take gode grwel y-mad of freys flesshe, y-draw thorw a straynour, and caste ther-to. An whan thou seruyst yt inne, knocke owt the marw of the bonys, an ley the marwe .ij. gobettys or .iij. in a dysshe, as the semyth best, and serue forth.

autodoc



Other versions of this recipe:

Fleshy Leaves of Cabbages (Libre del Coch)

And first the cabbage-heads (Le Menagier de Paris)

And know that cabbages like to be put on the fire early in the morning (Le Menagier de Paris)

Cabbage is hot and dries out the body and makes people sing well (Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard)

CABBAGES are of five kinds: the best are those which have been touched with frost (Le Menagier de Paris)

Cabochis (Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books)

Heads of cabbage (Le Menagier de Paris)

Pottage of cabbage flowers (Ouverture de Cuisine)


Recipes with similar titles:

Cabogys (Recipes from the Wagstaff Miscellany)




Links to modern interpretations:


Give it Forth  

Caboges
Yonnie Travis
Give it Forth
http://giveitforth.blogspot.com/2015/12/harleian-ms-279-caboges-1430-braised.html






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