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Lardy Milk


This is an excerpt from Le Menagier de Paris
(France, 1393 - Janet Hinson, trans.)
The original source can be found at David Friedman's website

LARDY MILK. Take milk of cows or ewes and put to boil in the fire, and throw in bits of bacon and some saffron: and have eggs, that is both white and yolk, well-beaten and throw in all at once, without stirring, and make it all boil together, and then take it off the fire and leave it to turn; or without eggs, use verjuice to turn it. And when it is cool, tie it up stoutly in a piece of cloth or net and give it whatever shape you wish, flat or long, and weighted with a large rock let it cool on a side-board all night, and the next day release it and fry it alone without added grease, or with grease if you wish; and it is placed on plates or in bowls like slices of bacon and stuck with cloves and pignon nuts. And if you want to make it green, use turnsole.

autodoc



Other versions of this recipe:

Lede lardes (Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986])

Alayd mylk (A Noble Boke off Cookry)

Larded boiled meat (Le Viandier de Taillevent)

Larded milk (Le Viandier de Taillevent)

Ledlardes (A Noble Boke off Cookry)

Letards (Thomas Awkbarow's Recipes (MS Harley 5401))

Lete Lardes (Forme of Cury)

Let lardes (Fourme of Curye [Rylands MS 7])

Lete Lorre (Thomas Awkbarow's Recipes (MS Harley 5401))

Letelorye (Forme of Cury)

Lete lorye (Fourme of Curye [Rylands MS 7])

Lethe lory (Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books)

Letlardes (Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books)

Let lory (Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books)

To make lyede milke (Gentyll manly Cokere (MS Pepys 1047))

Lette lardes (Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books)




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