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Heads Of cabbage


This is an excerpt from Le Menagier de Paris
(France, 1393 - Janet Hinson, trans.)
The original source can be found at David Friedman's website

Heads of cabbage, at the end of grape-harvest. And when the head of this cabbage, which is in the middle, is removed, pull and replant the cabbage stalk in new ground, and there will come out large spreading leaves: and a cabbage holds great place, and these are called Roman cabbages, and eaten in winter; and from the stalks, if they are replanted, come little cabbages called sprouts which are eaten with raw herbs and vinegar; and if you have plenty, they should be well cleaned, washed in hot water, and put to cook whole with a little water: and then when they are cooked, add salt and oil, and stir it up thick without water, and put olive oil on in Lent. Then there are other cabbages known as Easter cabbage because they are eaten at Easter, but they are sown in August; and when after sowing they are seen to be of half a foot in height, you pluck them and replant elsewhere, and they should be frequently watered.

autodoc



Other versions of this recipe:

Fleshy Leaves of Cabbages (Libre del Coch)

And first the cabbage-heads (Le Menagier de Paris)

And know that cabbages like to be put on the fire early in the morning (Le Menagier de Paris)

Cabbage is hot and dries out the body and makes people sing well (Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard)

CABBAGES are of five kinds: the best are those which have been touched with frost (Le Menagier de Paris)

Cabochis (Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books)

Caboges (Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books)

Pottage of cabbage flowers (Ouverture de Cuisine)




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