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partriges Are Frigid By Nature


This is an excerpt from Das Kochbuch des Meisters Eberhard
(Germany, 15th century - V. Bach, trans.)
The original source can be found at Mark S. Harris' Florilegium

Partriges are frigid by nature, though not as frigid as domestic chickens. Its meat is not bad, but tender. Eating it does not harm healthy people, but it is not good for the sick and causes phlegm. Take its gall and mix it with old lard and in cuius cute pedicule exterius de sudore carnis crescunt illi se cum eo sepe perungant (?) and it passes through the skin. You will not find better [?]. Partridges are very healthy, and Rhazes says of them that is they are eaten boiled, they will drive the bad moisture and any rotten food out of the stomach. They also cause constipation.

Rephun est frigide nature atque domestica galina perdice frigidior est. Caro eius infirma non est sed fragilis. Et comesta sanos non multum ledit. Infirmis autem non valet quia facit sleymig. Accipe fel eius et veteris aruine commisce et in cuius cute pedicule exterius de sudore carnis crescunt illi se cum eo sepe pervngant et cutem eius pertransit et vlterius non crescunt. Rephuner sein gar gesund. Vnd spricht Rasis, das sie die eygenschaft habenn, wie man sie isset gesotenn oder gepratenn, so vertreiben sie die bösen feuchtigkeit von dem magenn vnd all faul speyß vnd stopffenn sie den leib.

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Other versions of this recipe:

Tigelada de perdiz (A Treatise of Portuguese Cuisine from the 15th Century)

Tigelada de perdiz (outra receita) (A Treatise of Portuguese Cuisine from the 15th Century)

A Dish of Partridge (An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook)

Partridge (An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook)

Partridges (Enseignements qui enseingnent a apareillier toutes manieres de viandes)

Partridges (Le Viandier de Taillevent)

Partridges mate towards the middle of February (Le Menagier de Paris)




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