Dyvers desire
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Recipes from the Wagstaff Miscellany (England, 1460), entitled "Dyvers desire". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

Dyvers desire. Grynd reysons draw hem up with osey othir with swete wyn that hit ve somdele thyn do hit in a pott mynse datys & do ther to & reysons of coraunse clovys macys poudyr of pepyr & poudyr lombard & sigure take pyggez clene y schallyd or kede or lomb or konyng or chikenes choppyd small in pecys & frye hit & do hit to gedyr boyle hit & sesyn hit up with poudyr of gynger & salt & yf thu wilt take venyger & make hit egyr & serve hit forth & yf thu wylt grynd almondes & do in the same maner & coloure hit with turnesole othir let hit be white whethir thu wilt and yf thu may make past of eyron & paryd floure make yn thy foyle & boyle hit in small pelets or els in pelys & fry hem in white grece lat the flesch be out & when the sew boyleth do hit ther to & serve hit forth or yf thu wylt make foyles of past & couche ther yn foyl flesch of capons & porke sodyn & groundyn & seson hit up with poudres & salt make pelets ther of eche pelet as grete as a fynger loke hit be well y closyd & frydd put hit in dysches & poure the syrip abovyn & let no venyger come ther yn yf thu wilt have a stondyng potage ther of draw hit more chargeaunt & draw hit forth as mortrewys that thu makyst of reysons & of the same colour as that othir ys before & do parte the othir in the dysches and yf thu wylt make ther of a bakyn thu may put everych of them by hem sylf or els depart that on with that othir & serve hit forth whethir thy wylt hote or cold & strew ther on a dragge of paryd gynger mynsyd & anys in confite & blaunch poudyr & serve hit forth whetyr hit be in the forme of potage or of bakyn mete in what kind that thu wylt thu may hit & a ley hit with yolkes of eyron yf thu lyst aftyr the boylyng take som of the same & set hit on the fyre yn a pott & at the boylyng have yolkes of eyron drawn thorow a streynour in to a bolle & poure yn the wyn softely & rennyng & stere hit s fast in the bolle for quellyng & loke that hit be ryght chargeaunt of yolkes & put hit in to that other sewe that ys made by fore ster hit well to gedyr do hit forth loke no venyger come ther on loke hit be doucet & som dele bytyng of the poudres and yf thu wilt make hit of fisch thu mayse in the same maner as thu dedist the flesch take calvour samon base & melet splattyd & choppyd in pecys & frydd & do ther with as thu dost with the flesch or take a perch or els haddok or base sodyn pike out the bonys grynd hit & medyll hit with good poudres & salt & make hit in rounde pelets than have a batire of mylke of almondys put the pelets ther yn take hem up & frye hem yn hole rolle hem rounde ley hem in disches & poure the syrip a bovyn and yf thu lyst thu maist do with flesch yn the same maner.



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

raisins
suet
wine
dates
mace
podour
pepper
sugar
lamb
chicken
ginger
salt
vinegar
nuts
turnsol
pastry
eggs
flour
grease
pork
fruit
bacon
anise
yolks
fish
salmon
millet
seafood
bones
milk


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]

macys: Mace.
turnesole: A number of plants of the genus Heliotropium, used to produce red, purple, or blue colors.


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Recipes from the Wagstaff Miscellany". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?wagst:97>. Accessed on October 19, 2019, 8:48 am.




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