lxxj - Murrey
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books (England, 1430), entitled "lxxj - Murrey". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

lxxj - Murrey. Take Porke an Vele, and sethe it, and grynd it, and draw it with the self brothe; then take bred y-gratyd, and pouder of Gyngere and of Galyngale, and Hony, an caste ther-to, and boyle it y-fere; and make it chargeaunt, and coloure it with Saunderys and serue forth [correction; sic = f].



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

Murri is not suitable to be used unless of the infused sort, because of its benefits and penetrating quality; following this is murri made of grape juice with spices but without burned bread. The murri that people make with scorched honey and bread and other things is not suitable to be used at all, for it causes black bile and has neither benefit nor penetrating flavor. [An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook]

A Dish of Murri from Any Meat You Wish. Put meat in the pot and throw on it spices, an onion pounded with cilantro and salt, and throw on it three spoonfuls of murri and one spoonful of vinegar, and the same of oil, and fry and cover with oil and cook until done and browned. Ladle out and sprinkle with pepper and cinnamon. If you omit the vinegar, it is good, and if you throw in soaked garbanzos and a little rue, it is good, God willing. [An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook]

Morree. XXXVIII. Take Almandes blaunched, waisshe hem. grynde hem. and temper hem up with rede wyne, and alye hem with flour of Rys. do þerto Pynes yfryed. and colour it with saundres. do þerto powdour fort and powdour douce and salt, messe it forth and flour it with aneys confyt whyte. [Forme of Cury]

.xxxviij. Morree. Tak almaundes blaunched, waisch hem, grynde hem, & temper hem up with rede wyne, & alye hem with flour of rys, do therto pynes & fryed & colour it with saundres, do therto poudour fort & poudour douce and salt & messe hit forth & flour hit with aneys confyt whyte. [Fourme of Curye [Rylands MS 7]]

Murre. Take almonde mylke, and draw hit up with brothe of beef, and take porke braied, or elles braune of capons braied, and boyle hit togeder; and put therto sugre, saunders, saffron, but more of saffron than of saunders that hit be depe coloured, and pouder of greynes, and let hit boyle that hit be stondynge, and thik hit with a litel floure of rys ; and settynge doune take a lytel vynegur, and medel wyth the flour of canel, and of ginger and sugre, and put therto, and stere hit wel togeder, and when hit is dressed up strewe above red anys in confith, and serve hit forthe. [Ancient Cookery [Arundel 334]]

Morree. XXXVIII. Take Almandes blaunched, waisshe hem. grynde hem. and temper hem up with rede wyne, and alye hem with flour of Rys. do þerto Pynes yfryed. and colour it with saundres. do þerto powdour fort and powdour douce and salt, messe it forth and flour it with aneys confyt whyte. [Forme of Cury]

XXXVII - FOR TO MAKE MURREY. Tak mulbery and bray hem in a morter and wryng hem thorth a cloth and do hem in a pot over the fyre and do thereto fat bred and wyte gresse and let it nazt boyle no ofter than onys and do thereto a god party of sugur and zif yt be nozt ynowe colowrd brey mulburus and serve yt forthe. [Forme of Cury]

XXVI - For To Make Morrey. Requir' de Carnibus ut supra. [Forme of Cury]

.xxxviij. Morree. Tak almaundes blaunched, waisch hem, grynde hem, & temper hem up with rede wyne, & alye hem with flour of rys, do therto pynes & fryed & colour it with saundres, do therto poudour fort & poudour douce and salt & messe hit forth & flour hit with aneys confyt whyte. [Fourme of Curye [Rylands MS 7]]

Moree. rice flour or amidon, whichever can be found; that the color of sandalwood will be had, grind well in a mortar; and then it must be tempered in almond milk and well strained. And then put powdered cinnamon and of galingale. If it is a fish day, put in pears or chestnuts or salmon, or luce or perch; if a meat day, put in veal or goat, if you would have a good and royal meat. [MS Royal 12.C.xii]

Murrey. Tak mulbery & bray hem in a morter & wryng hem þorh a cloþ, & do hem in a pot ouer þe fyre; & do þereto bred & wyte gresse, & let yt nat boyle non ofter þan onys. & do þereto a god perty of sugur, & if yt be not ynowe ycolowrd brey mulburus; & serue yt forþe. [MS Douce 257]

Morrey. For to make morrey, require de carnibus vt supra [MS Douce 257]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

pork
veal
broth
bread
podour
ginger
galingale
honey
sandalwood


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]

galyngale:


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?twofi:71>. Accessed on August 17, 2019, 2:09 pm.

Searchable index of "An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?anony:131>. Accessed on August 17, 2019, 2:09 pm.

Searchable index of "Forme of Cury". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?forme:38>. Accessed on August 17, 2019, 2:09 pm.

Searchable index of "Fourme of Curye [Rylands MS 7]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?fourm:37>. Accessed on August 17, 2019, 2:09 pm.

Searchable index of "Ancient Cookery [Arundel 334]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?ancie:180>. Accessed on August 17, 2019, 2:09 pm.

Searchable index of "MS Royal 12.C.xii". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?royal:32>. Accessed on August 17, 2019, 2:09 pm.

Searchable index of "MS Douce 257". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?douce:37>. Accessed on August 17, 2019, 2:09 pm.

Searchable index of "MS Douce 257". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?douce:85>. Accessed on August 17, 2019, 2:09 pm.




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