xiij - Vyaund leche
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by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books (England, 1430), entitled "xiij - Vyaund leche". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

xiij - Vyaund leche. Take a gode quantyte of Brawn, an Hony, and a lytil brede, and let sethe to-gederys pouder Pepir, Clowys, Maces, an Safroun, and draw it thorwe a straynoure, and chafe it a litel, and caste it in fayre dysshis, an let it kele, and than serue forth [correction; sic = f].



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

Porridge of almonds and bread in Lent. Make thick almond milk and add saffron. Take the crusts of white bread, cut in small pieces, and let them boil in it, and add chopped figs and grains of stoned raisins from oversea. [Wel ende edelike spijse]

Slices. Take figs, raisins, boiled almond milk, hot water pastries, flat cakes and white bread crusts cut into small cubes. Boil your milk, add saffron (to give it colour) and sugar, and boil everything together until it becomes thick enough to slice. Put it into bowls. [Le Viandier de Taillevent]

xj - Vyaund leche. Take cowe Mylke, and set it ouer the fyre, and throw ther-on Saunderys, and make a styf poshotte of Ale; than hang the croddys ther-of in a pynne, in a fayre clothe, and lat it ouer-renne; than take it and put hony ther-to, and melle it y-fere; then feche the croddys of the deye, (Note: Dairymaid) and melle hem to-gederys, and lay it on a chesefatte or it be torne, .iij. fold or iiij. fold, in lynen clothe, and salt it, and leche it; and thanne serue it forth. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

xviij - Vyaund leche. Take a Tenche, an steue hym in a potte with Wyne; when he is y-now, pyke owt the bonys, take an stampe hem in a morter; then take a lytil of thicke Almaunde mylke, and putte ther-to; then take hem vppe, and putte hem in the brothe forsayde, that it was y-sothe in, and that y-straynid; caste ther-to Maces, Clowes, pouder Pepir, and Pouder Canelle; than caste Safron ther-to; then caste him in a dysshe, and lat hem kele; then put Vynegre, pouder Gyngere, Canel y-now in ye botmond (Note: Bottom) ther-of, vnnethe y-helyd. (Note: Scarcely covered) [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

xvij - Vyaund leche. Take calfes fete an hepe, and lat stepe in cold watere; then boyle hem smal; than take the brothe and gode Milke of Almaundys, and choppe the Syneys (Note: Sinews) in-to the same milk rythte smal; than boyle it ouer the fyre, and coloure it with Saunderys, and put Sugre y-now in-to the potte; and 3if thou wolt haue hym of .ij. colour, than take an coloure but half with Saunderys, and caste that othere half in a dysshe, and lat it kele; and whan it is cold, then that is y-colouryd with Saunderys, het it, and euene (Note: Euenly) melle it hote; caste hem a-bouyn the other, and lat kele, an than serue forth. Than take Sugre, a quantyte of swete Wyne, and Blaunche pouder ther-on, and make Sawce ther-of; And so colde, ley it in the dysshis, be-helyd, (Note: Covered) and serue forth [correction; sic = f]. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

Lenten slices. Take peeled almonds, crush very well in a mortar, steep in water boiled and cooled to lukewarm, strain through cheesecloth, and boil your almond milk on a few coals for an instant or two. Take some cooked hot water pastries a day or two old and cut them into bits as small as large dice. Take figs, dates and Digne raisins, and slice the figs and dates like the hot water pastries. Throw everything into it, leave it to thicken like Frumenty, and boil some sugar with it. To give it colour, have some saffron for colouring it like Frumenty. It should be gently salted. [Le Viandier de Taillevent]

x - Vyaund de leche. Take whyte Wyne a god quantite, an putte it on a potte; then putte ther-to raw 3olkys of eyroun y-tryid, and pouder of clowys, and pouder canel y-now, an Safroun y-now; than lat it boyle tyl it be ry3th chargeaunte, an then sette it doun; and take an sette ouer a panne of cowe milke, and throw Saunderys y-nowe ther-on; then make a styf poshote (Note: Posset) of Ale; then take the croddys, an lat it honge on a pyn in a clothe, an lat it cleue euer therueowt; (Note: Throughout? )then take the cawdel forsayd, and melle hem to-gederys in a clothe, with the poshotte; (Note: Posset) then put ther-on Sugre, Canel, pouder Gyngere y-now; presse hem vp sware, (Note: Square) an leche it, and serue it forth. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

xj - Vyaund leche. Take cowe Mylke, and set it ouer the fyre, and throw ther-on Saunderys, and make a styf poshotte of Ale; than hang the croddys ther-of in a pynne, in a fayre clothe, and lat it ouer-renne; than take it and put hony ther-to, and melle it y-fere; then feche the croddys of the deye, (Note: Dairymaid) and melle hem to-gederys, and lay it on a chesefatte or it be torne, .iij. fold or iiij. fold, in lynen clothe, and salt it, and leche it; and thanne serue it forth. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

xij - Vyaund leche. Take Eyroun, the whyte and the 3olke, and caste hem in a morter, an breke hem wyl; than take cowe mylke and caste ther-to, and menge hem wyl to-gederys; than put al in a panne, and lat boyle; and with ale make it to a poshotte; then hange the croddys in a pynne, and let it ouer-renne; melle the croddys with hony; then take the bladys of Barlyche, or of Percely, and stampe hem, and wrynge thorw a clothe; and so alle the grene, melle it a-mong the croddys; thenne take the cruddys that comen fro the deye, melle hem to-gederys, presse hem, and serue hem forth; an the coloure wyl ben than Motley. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

xiiij - Vyaunde leche. Take Hony a gode quantite; then take pouder Pepir, and Safroun, and Canel, and caste ther-to; and then caste it on a dysshe, and let it kele, and serue forth. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

xvij - Vyaund leche. Take calfes fete an hepe, and lat stepe in cold watere; then boyle hem smal; than take the brothe and gode Milke of Almaundys, and choppe the Syneys (Note: Sinews) in-to the same milk rythte smal; than boyle it ouer the fyre, and coloure it with Saunderys, and put Sugre y-now in-to the potte; and 3if thou wolt haue hym of .ij. colour, than take an coloure but half with Saunderys, and caste that othere half in a dysshe, and lat it kele; and whan it is cold, then that is y-colouryd with Saunderys, het it, and euene (Note: Euenly) melle it hote; caste hem a-bouyn the other, and lat kele, an than serue forth. Than take Sugre, a quantyte of swete Wyne, and Blaunche pouder ther-on, and make Sawce ther-of; And so colde, ley it in the dysshis, be-helyd, (Note: Covered) and serue forth [correction; sic = f]. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

xviij - Vyaund leche. Take a Tenche, an steue hym in a potte with Wyne; when he is y-now, pyke owt the bonys, take an stampe hem in a morter; then take a lytil of thicke Almaunde mylke, and putte ther-to; then take hem vppe, and putte hem in the brothe forsayde, that it was y-sothe in, and that y-straynid; caste ther-to Maces, Clowes, pouder Pepir, and Pouder Canelle; than caste Safron ther-to; then caste him in a dysshe, and lat hem kele; then put Vynegre, pouder Gyngere, Canel y-now in ye botmond (Note: Bottom) ther-of, vnnethe y-helyd. (Note: Scarcely covered) [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

honey
bread
podour
pepper
cloves
mace
saffron


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]


Procedure
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[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?twofi:166>. Accessed on February 26, 2020, 12:45 pm.

Searchable index of "Wel ende edelike spijse". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?welen:17>. Accessed on February 26, 2020, 12:45 pm.

Searchable index of "Le Viandier de Taillevent". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?viand:63>. Accessed on February 26, 2020, 12:45 pm.




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