xij - Fride Creme of Almaundys
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books (England, 1430), entitled "xij - Fride Creme of Almaundys". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

xij - Fride Creme of Almaundys. Take almaundys, an stampe hem, an draw it vp wyth a fyne thykke mylke, y-temperyd wyth clene water; throw hem on, an sette hem in the fyre, an let boyle onys: than tak hem a-down, an caste salt ther-on, an let hem reste a forlongwey (Note: Other MS. forlange.) or to, an caste a lytyl sugre ther-to; an than caste it on a fayre lynen clothe, fayre y-wasche an drye, an caste it al a-brode on the clothe with a fayre ladel: an let the clothe ben holdyn a-brode, an late all the water vnder-nethe the clothe be had a-way, an thanne gadere alle the kreme in the clothe, an let hongy on an pyn, and let the water droppe owt to (Note: two.) or .iij. owrys; than take it of the pyn, an put it on a bolle of tre, and caste whyte sugre y-now ther-to, an a lytil salt; and 3if it wexe thikke, take swete wyn an put ther-to that it be no3t sene: and whan it is I-dressid in the maner of mortrewys, take red anys in comfyte, or the leuys of borage, an sette hem on the dysshe, an serue forth.



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

Fried creme de almondes. Take Almondes, and blanche hem, and wassh hem in faire water, and bray hem small in a morter with faire water; And then take hem and the water togidre som-what thik, and drawe hem thorgh a streynour into a faire potte, And set hem ouer the fire, and lete hem boyle ones; And then take hem downe, and cast thereto Salte, and lete stonde a forlonge wey or .ij. And cast a litull vinegre therto; And then cast hit on a faire lynnen cloth that is faire wassh, and the water y-wronge oute there-of; and cast hit all abrode with the ladull, and lete men hold the cloth al abrode; and then take a ladill, and draw vndur the cloth, and draw awey the water all that a man may. And then gadur al the creme togidur in the clothe; And then take the cloth with the creme, and hange hit vppon a pyn, and lete the water droppe oute two or thre houres or more; And then take hit of the cloth, and putte hit in a boll of tre, And caste Sugur ynogh thereto and a litul salt. And if hit wex to thik, take swete wyne, and temper hit with ale; And then take reysons of coraunce, clene y-wassh, and put hem there-in, that they be not seyn; And whan hit is dressed in maner of mortrewes, take rede anneys in confite, or elles levis of Burage, (Note: D. adds flowres) and set there-on in a dissh. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

Fried creme de almondes. Take Almondes, and blanche hem, and wassh hem in faire water, and bray hem small in a morter with faire water; And then take hem and the water togidre som-what thik, and drawe hem thorgh a streynour into a faire potte, And set hem ouer the fire, and lete hem boyle ones; And then take hem downe, and cast thereto Salte, and lete stonde a forlonge wey or .ij. And cast a litull vinegre therto; And then cast hit on a faire lynnen cloth that is faire wassh, and the water y-wronge oute there-of; and cast hit all abrode with the ladull, and lete men hold the cloth al abrode; and then take a ladill, and draw vndur the cloth, and draw awey the water all that a man may. And then gadur al the creme togidur in the clothe; And then take the cloth with the creme, and hange hit vppon a pyn, and lete the water droppe oute two or thre houres or more; And then take hit of the cloth, and putte hit in a boll of tre, And caste Sugur ynogh thereto and a litul salt. And if hit wex to thik, take swete wyne, and temper hit with ale; And then take reysons of coraunce, clene y-wassh, and put hem there-in, that they be not seyn; And whan hit is dressed in maner of mortrewes, take rede anneys in confite, or elles levis of Burage, (Note: D. adds flowres) and set there-on in a dissh. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

cream
nuts
milk
salt
sugar
suet
wine
anise
borage


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]

borage: Common Borage (Borago officinalis). A kitchen herb common across Europe. Borage flowers are blue.


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?twofi:12>. Accessed on December 9, 2018, 12:27 pm.




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