Cviij - Prymerose
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books (England, 1430), entitled "Cviij - Prymerose". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

Cviij - Prymerose. Take other half-pound of Flowre of Rys, .iij. pound of Almaundys, half an vnce of hony and Safroune, and take the flowres of the Prymerose, and grynd hem, and temper hem vppe with Mylke of the Almaundys, and do pouder Gyngere ther-on: boyle it, and plante thin skluce (Note: viscous compound? ) with Rosys, and serue forth [correction; sic = f].



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

Cxxvij - Prymerose. Ry3th as vyolette. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

To mak prymerolle in pasthe tak blanched almondes and flour of prymerose grind it and temper it with swet wyne and good brothe drawinge into the thik mylk put it into a pot with sugur salt and saffron that it haue colour lik prymerolle and boile it that it be stondinge and alay it with flour of rise and serue it as a standinge potage and strawe ther on flour of prymerolle aboue and ye may diaper it with rape rialle in dressinge of some other sewe. [A Noble Boke off Cookry]

Cxxvij - Prymerose. Ry3th as vyolette. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

Prymerose. Loke that thou have god broth & cler almondys grounen tempre it with the broth & drawe it thorow a cloth tak floures of primrose & do ther to & tak braun of hennys & hewe & grynd it & do ther to & let it wellen & do ther to flour of rys tyl it be chargeaunt & do ther to flowres of primerose & ginger & sugre and salt & qwan is sal ben dressed ley on floures of primerose the maner of spices. [Recipes from John Crophill's Commonplace Book]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

primroses
flour
rice
nuts
honey
saffron
flowers
milk
podour
ginger
roses


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?twofi:108>. Accessed on October 23, 2019, 3:09 am.

Searchable index of "A Noble Boke off Cookry". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?noble:69>. Accessed on October 23, 2019, 3:09 am.

Searchable index of "Recipes from John Crophill's Commonplace Book". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?croph:36>. Accessed on October 23, 2019, 3:09 am.




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