Creme Bolyd
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Thomas Awkbarow's Recipes (MS Harley 5401) (England, 15th century)
[based on a concordance], entitled "Creme Bolyd". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

Creme Bolyd. Recipe creme of kow mylk & egg зolkes, sugur & saferon, & medyl all togyder; & bole it til it be standyng, & dresse it vp in a dysh in lechys, & playnt it with flowres of borage.



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

Creme boiled. Take mylke, and boile hit; And then take yolkes of eyren, and try hem fro the white, and drawe hem thorgh a streynour, and cast hem into the mylke; and then sette hit on the fire, and hete hit hote, and lete not boyle; and stirre it wel til hit be som-what thik; And caste thereto sugur and salte; and kut then faire paynmain soppes, and caste the soppes there-on, And serue it in maner of potage. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

To mak creme buile tak cow creme and yolks of eggs drawe and well bet that it be stonding and put ther to sugur and colour it with saffron and salt it then lesk it in dyshes and plant ther in floures of borage and serue it. [A Noble Boke off Cookry]

xiij - Creme Boylede. Take creme or mylke, and [correction; sic = MS. or.] brede of paynemayn, or ellys of tendyr brede, an breke it on the creme, or elles in the mylke, an set it on the fyre tyl it be warme hot; and thorw a straynour throwe it, and put it in-to a fayre potte, an sette it on the fyre, an stere euermore: an whan it is almost y-boylyd, take fayre 3olkys of eyron, an draw hem thorw a straynowr, and caste hem ther-to, and let hem stonde ouer the fyre tyl it boyle almost, an till [correction; sic = MS. thow.] it be skylfully (Note: reasonably.) thikke; than caste a ladel-ful, or more or lasse, of boter ther-to, an a good quantite of whyte sugre, and a litel salt, an than dresse it on a dysshe in maner of mortrewys. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

Creme boiled. Take mylke, and boile hit; And then take yolkes of eyren, and try hem fro the white, and drawe hem thorgh a streynour, and cast hem into the mylke; and then sette hit on the fire, and hete hit hote, and lete not boyle; and stirre it wel til hit be som-what thik; And caste thereto sugur and salte; and kut then faire paynmain soppes, and caste the soppes there-on, And serue it in maner of potage. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

Crem boyled. Take crem of cowe mylke, and zolkes of egges, and bete hom wel togedur, and do hit in a pot, and let hit boyle tyl hit be stondynge, and do therto sugur, and colour hit with saffron, and dresse hit forthe in leches, and plante thcrin floures of borage, or of vyolet* [Ancient Cookery [Arundel 334]]

Creme boyled. Take swete creme of melke do hit in a pott do ther to butter clearyfyed set hit on the fyre stere hit when hit boyles have yolkes of eyron drawyn thorowgh a streynour in to a boyle & put boylyng coem ther to with a ladyl styr hit well for quallyng & put hit in the pott a ghen & yf be nedd gheve hit a lytyl more of the fyre loke hit have white sygure y nowghe & of the batture also loke hit be standyng as mortrues & coloure hit with safron loke hit be salt messe hit forth and strew on poudour of gynger. [Recipes from the Wagstaff Miscellany]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

cream
milk
eggs
yolks
sugar
saffron
flowers
borage


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]

borage: Common Borage (Borago officinalis). A kitchen herb common across Europe. Borage flowers are blue.


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Thomas Awkbarow's Recipes (MS Harley 5401)". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?thoma:9>. Accessed on November 17, 2019, 5:20 am.

Searchable index of "Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?twofi:371>. Accessed on November 17, 2019, 5:20 am.

Searchable index of "A Noble Boke off Cookry". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?noble:17>. Accessed on November 17, 2019, 5:20 am.

Searchable index of "Ancient Cookery [Arundel 334]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?ancie:108>. Accessed on November 17, 2019, 5:20 am.

Searchable index of "Recipes from the Wagstaff Miscellany". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?wagst:76>. Accessed on November 17, 2019, 5:20 am.




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