To make a potpourri called "Oylla podrida" in Spanish
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Ouverture de Cuisine (France, 1604 - Daniel Myers, trans.), entitled "To make a potpourri called "Oylla podrida" in Spanish". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

To make a potpourri called "Oylla podrida" in Spanish. Take a piece of beef of two sides, put it to boil in a large pot, & put with a capon or chicken: have it boil a half hour, put a little leg of mutton therein, then put a duck also into the pot: then little legs of veal redressed two stuffed pigeons, two partridges, two little stuffed cabbages, two begasses, two Bologna sausages, and two partly cooked mortadellas to put thereon, the drippings from a ham of Mayence also partly cooked, the feet and ears of a pig also partly cooked: then put the little sausages also into the pot, salted lemons cut into quarters, four entrail sausages, four yellow roots, that are stuffed with veal meat redressed, four stomachs of sheep that are stuffed with good herbs & good fat cheese, with a fried onion & raw eggs, like stuffings are made, & fry it in butter: & put into the pot a handful of marjoram and mint together, cauliflower in two parts: then you have little pots there, or put in stewed potatoes like is said above, again another pot with capers of Maiorcque well washed & boiled with good broth, & white wine, a little pepper: then another pot put pine nuts & pistachios that are washed: then make green raviolis, like written above: then the other little raviolis filled with almonds & ground, & quince candied with sugar & cinnamon, two egg yolks therein, & fry the raviolis in butter, & keep so on a plate: then take peeled chestnuts, and put in the pot, & let stew well together, put therein half an ounce of ground nutmeg: have another little pot, and put therein large peas, and Roman beans that are well cooked together: then look well in the pot that it will not be cooked too much: that when it is cooked enough remove, & put into separate plates: take a very large plate, & dress the meats between the ones with the others: then the hams of Mayence that you have put into the plate, the one here the other there, & the boiled raviolis must be moistened with fat broth, & sprinkled thereon cinnamon & parmesan, & put them in the plates here & there: the other raviolis similarly: then that which you have in the little pot put each sort separately in the plate, the Bologna sausages also here & there: then have a little guinea fowl roasted & well larded, a dozen little birds also roasted, & put in the middll of the plate thereon, & look well the placing you choose that one can see them, then take a dozen feet of sheep well washed to put all around the plate: then take a pound of dates cooked in wine & sugar, & put them with a spoon, & put them between the sheep feet, after take the broth from your pot, chafe it very hot, & cast thereon & without it moistening the roast, & raviolis: & serve so.



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
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[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

beef
chicken
sheep
ducks
veal
pigeons
partridges
worts
sausage
pork
lemons
herbs
cheese
onions
eggs
butter
marjoram
mint
cauliflower
potatos
caper
broth
wine
pepper
pine_nuts
nuts
pistachios
quince
sugar
cinnamon
yolks
chestnuts
nutmeg
peas
beans
birds
dates


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]

quince: A close relative of the apple, with a hard, fragrant fruit (Cydonia oblonga).


Procedure
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[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Ouverture de Cuisine". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?ouver:137>. Accessed on December 6, 2019, 1:02 pm.




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