GALYNTYNE
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Forme of Cury (England, 1390), entitled "GALYNTYNE". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

GALYNTYNE. XX.VI. XVIII. Take crustes of Brede and grynde hem smale, do þerto powdour of galyngale, of canel, of gyngyner and salt it, tempre it with vynegur and drawe it up þurgh a straynour & messe it forth.



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

Galentyne. Take crust of brede and grynde hit smalle, Take powder of galingale and temper with alle Powder of gyngere and salt also. Temper hit with venegur er þou more do, Draw3e hit þurughe a streynour þenne, And messe hit forthe before gode menne. [Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]]

.Cxxxvj. Galentyne. Take crustes of brede & grynde hem smale. do therto poudour of galyngale. of canel. of ginger. & salt it temper hyt with vyneger & drawe it up throw a straynour & messe hit forth. [Fourme of Curye [Rylands MS 7]]

To mak sauce galentyne tak crust of brown bred and stepe them in venygar put ther to pouder of canelle and let it step till it be broun then streyn it ij or iij tymes cast it to pouder and salt and let it be stonding and serve it. [A Noble Boke off Cookry]

Sauce galentyne. Take faire crustes of browne brede stept in vinegre, And cast thereto pouder of canell, and lete hit stepe therewith, til hit be browne; then drawe hit thorgh a streynour ones or twyes, And caste there-to pouder of peper, And lete hit be som-whatte stonding, And then serue hit forthe. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

Sauce galentyne. Take faire cruste3 of broun brede, stepe them in vinegre, and put ther-to poudre canel, and lete it stepe ther-wyth til it be broun; and thanne drawe it thurwe a straynour .ij. tymes or .iij., and thanne put therto poudre piper and salte: and lete it be sumwhat stondynge, and not to thynne, and serue forth. [Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books]

To make gallentyne. Take Crustys of white sowre brede and tost hit tyll hit be brown brynnyd and stepe hit in vynAgyre and draw hem throwgh A streynner with the same vynneAger set on the fyre And boyle hit well and cast ther yn sawnders pouder of gynger And synamom and a litell pepur And if hit be to terte put more sugar ther to And that will Amend hit. [Gentyll manly Cokere (MS Pepys 1047)]

Lamprey in galantine. Bleed it as before, keep the blood, and cook it in vinegar, wine and a bit of water. When it is cooked, put it to cool on a cloth. Take grilled bread, steep in your broth, [strain] through cheesecloth, boil with the blood, and stir well so that it does not burn. When it is well boiled, pour it into a mortar or a clean basin and stir continually until it is cooled. Grind ginger, cassia flowers, cloves, grains_of_paradise, nutmeg and long pepper, steep in your broth, put as before into a basin with your fish, and put the basin in a wooden or tin dish. Thus you have good galantine. [Le Viandier de Taillevent]

To make galantyne. Take crustes of bred, and stepe hom in broken wyn or vynegar, and grinde hit smal, and drawe hit up with vynegur thurgh a streynour, and do therto pouder of galyngale, and of canel, and of ginger, and serve hit forthe. [Ancient Cookery [Arundel 334]]

.Cxxxvj. Galentyne. Take crustes of brede & grynde hem smale. do therto poudour of galyngale. of canel. of ginger. & salt it temper hyt with vyneger & drawe it up throw a straynour & messe hit forth. [Fourme of Curye [Rylands MS 7]]

To make gallentyne. Take Crustys of white sowre brede and tost hit tyll hit be brown brynnyd and stepe hit in vynAgyre and draw hem throwgh A streynner with the same vynneAger set on the fyre And boyle hit well and cast ther yn sawnders pouder of gynger And synamom and a litell pepur And if hit be to terte put more sugar ther to And that will Amend hit. [Gentyll manly Cokere (MS Pepys 1047)]

Galentyne. Take crust of brede and grynde hit smalle, Take powder of galingale and temper with alle Powder of gyngere and salt also. Temper hit with venegur er þou more do, Draw3e hit þurughe a streynour þenne, And messe hit forthe before gode menne. [Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

bread
podour
galingale
cinnamon
ginger
salt
vinegar


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]

galyngale:
canel: Cassia (Cinnamomum cassia - Sold as "cinnamon" in the United States). Possibly cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylenicum) as well.


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Forme of Cury". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?forme:137>. Accessed on December 10, 2019, 11:45 pm.

Searchable index of "Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?liber:72>. Accessed on December 10, 2019, 11:45 pm.

Searchable index of "Fourme of Curye [Rylands MS 7]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?fourm:137>. Accessed on December 10, 2019, 11:45 pm.

Searchable index of "A Noble Boke off Cookry". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?noble:125>. Accessed on December 10, 2019, 11:45 pm.

Searchable index of "Two Fifteenth-Century Cookery-Books". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?twofi:301>. Accessed on December 10, 2019, 11:45 pm.

Searchable index of "Gentyll manly Cokere (MS Pepys 1047)". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?genty:13>. Accessed on December 10, 2019, 11:45 pm.

Searchable index of "Le Viandier de Taillevent". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?viand:72>. Accessed on December 10, 2019, 11:45 pm.

Searchable index of "Ancient Cookery [Arundel 334]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?ancie:76>. Accessed on December 10, 2019, 11:45 pm.




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