For cominée of hens
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Enseignements qui enseingnent a apareillier toutes manieres de viandes (France, ca. 1300 - D. Myers, trans.), entitled "For cominée of hens ". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

For cominée of hens - If you want to make cominée of hens, take the hens and cook in wine and in water, and make boil, and skim off the crest, and cut the hens, and after take yolks of eggs, beat them well and mix with broth and add cumin, and put all together, then you will have cominée.



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

For comyne sewe. 3iff þou wylle make a comyne sew, Vele and motun and porke þou hew On smalle gobettis. put hom in pot With mynsud onyouns, ful wele I wot, And powder of Peper þou kast þerto. Coloure hit with safroune or þou more do, And draw3e alyoure of browne crust eke To alye þis sew þat is so meke. [Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]]

CHICKEN COMINY. Put pieces in water and a little wine to cook then fry in fat, then take a little bread, moisten in your stock, and first take ginger and cumin, mixed with verjuice, grind and sift and put all together with meat or chicken stock, and then add color with saffron or eggs or egg-yolks strained and poured from above into the soup after it has been removed from the fire.

Item, the best way is use milk as I said before, then grind your bread after your spices, but you must boil the milk first so that it does not curdle; and when the soup is done, the milk should be added to wine, though I see no reason for this, and fried, Some do not fry it, but it is said to be better fried. [Le Menagier de Paris]

Chicken cumin dish. Cook it in wine and water, quarter it, and fry it in lard. Temper your broth with a bit of wine, sieve, and boil with your meat. Add just a bit of ginger and cumin steeped in verjuice and wine. Take plenty of egg yolks, beat them well, and thread them into your pottage at the back of the fire. Make sure that it does not curdle. [Le Viandier de Taillevent]

To mak comyne set almond mylk on the fyer then tak amydon and stepe it and drawe it and put ther to pouder of comyne and boile it and stirr it well put ther to sugur or hony and colour it with saffron and salt it and let it be rynyinge, and ye will have it standing tak raw yolks of eggs well betene and put it in the pot at the setting downe then leshe it in dyshes and cast on a drige mad with hard yolks of eggs sugur mynced ginger clowes maces and serue it. [A Noble Boke off Cookry]

XXXIX - FOR TO MAKE COMYN. Tak god Almaunde mylk and lat yt boyle and do ther'in amydoun wyth flowr of Rys and colowr yt wyth safroun and after dresse yt wyth graynis of Poungarnetts other wyth reysens zyf thow hast non other and tak sugur and do theryn and serve it forthe. [Forme of Cury]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

chicken
wine
yolks
eggs
broth
cumin


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Enseignements qui enseingnent a apareillier toutes manieres de viandes". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?ensei:20>. Accessed on August 19, 2019, 10:18 pm.

Searchable index of "Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?liber:120>. Accessed on August 19, 2019, 10:18 pm.

Searchable index of "Le Menagier de Paris". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?menag:273>. Accessed on August 19, 2019, 10:18 pm.

Searchable index of "Le Viandier de Taillevent". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?viand:12>. Accessed on August 19, 2019, 10:18 pm.

Searchable index of "A Noble Boke off Cookry". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?noble:5>. Accessed on August 19, 2019, 10:18 pm.

Searchable index of "Forme of Cury". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?forme:234>. Accessed on August 19, 2019, 10:18 pm.




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