Furmente
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from Recipes from John Crophill's Commonplace Book (England, 1485), entitled "Furmente". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

Furmente. Tak whete & pike it fayre do it in a morter stampe it alitel & sprenkle it with water stampe it hol waysche it fayre do it in a pot boille it tyl it breste set it doun & tak cow melk playe it up with alytyl tyl it be thykke lye it up with yolkys of ayren colour it with saffron kep it wel fro brennynge.



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

To mak furmente tak whet and pik it clene and put it in a mortair and bray it till it hull then wenowe it and wesshe it and put it unto the pot and boile it till it brest then sett it down and play it up with cow mylk till yt be enoughe alay it with yolks of eggs and kep it that it byrn not, colour it with saffron do ther to sugar and salt it and serue it. [A Noble Boke off Cookry]

Furmentee. Take qwete (wheat) streyned, that is for to fay brosten (burst), and alay hit with gode swete mylk, and boyle hit; and stere hit well, and put therto sugre; and colour hit with saffron; and for a lorde put no brothe therto, but put therto a few zolkes of eyren beten, and stere hit wel that hit quayle noght (stir it well that it does not curdle); and when hit is fothen serve hit forthe. [Ancient Cookery [Arundel 334]]

I - FOR TO MAKE FURMENTY. Nym clene Wete and bray it in a morter wel that the holys gon al of and seyt yt til it breste and nym yt up. and lat it kele and nym fayre fresch broth and swete mylk of Almandys or swete mylk of kyne and temper yt al. and nym the yolkys of eyryn. boyle it a lityl and set yt adoun and messe yt forthe wyth fat venyson and fresh moton. [Forme of Cury]

Frumenty. Take wheat, prepare it, wash it very well, and cook it in water. When it is cooked, drain it. Take cow's milk boiled for an instant, add the wheat, and boil it for an instant. Move it to the back of the fire, stir often, and thread in plenty of egg yolks. Some add spices, saffron and venison stock. It should be yellowish and well thickened. [Le Viandier de Taillevent]

Frumenty, venison, pears and nuts. Note that for the frumenty you will need three hundred eggs. [Le Menagier de Paris]

FRUMENTY. First, you must hull your wheat the same as you would for hulled barley, and remember that for ten bowls you need a pound of hulled wheat, which you can sometimes find at the spice-shop already hulled for one blanc per pound. Clean it and cook it in water in the evening, and leave it overnight covered by the fire in lukewarm water, then take it out and wash it. Then boil milk in a skillet and do not stir it, for it would turn: and without waiting, put it all at once into a clean pot; and when it is cold, take the cream off the top so that this cream does not cause the frumenty to turn, and then boil the milk again with a little wheat, but very little wheat; then take egg yolks and pour them in, that for each sixth of milk a hundred eggs, then take the boiling milk, and beat the eggs with the milk, then move the pot back and throw in the eggs, and move it back (away); and if you see that it is trying to turn, put the pot in a full pail of water. On fish days, use milk: on meat days, use meat juices; and you can add saffron if the eggs aren't yellow enough.

Item, half a piece of ginger. [Le Menagier de Paris]

Furmente. Take wete, and pyke hit fayre and clene And do hit in a morter shene. Bray hit a lytelle, with water hit spryng Tyl hit hulle, with-oute lesyng. Þen wyndo hit wele, nede þou mot. Wasshe hit fayre, put hit in pot. Boyle hit tylle hit brest, þen Let hit doun, as I þe kenne. Take know mylke, and play hit up To hit be thykkerede to sup. Lye hit up with 3olkes of eyren, And kepe hit wele, lest hit berne. Coloure hit with safron and salt hit wele, And servyd hit forthe, Syr, at þe mele. With sugur candy, þou may hit dowce, If hit be served in grete lordys howce. Take black sugur for mener menne. Be ware þer with, for hit wylle brenne. [Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]]

Furmenty. Nym clene wete & bray it in a morter wel, þat þe holys gon al of, & seyt yt til yt breste; & nym yt vp & lat it kele. And nym fayre fresch broþ & swete mylk of almandys or swete mylk of kyne and temper yt al. & nym þe olkys of eyryn & saffron & do þerto. Boyle it a lityl & set yt adoun, & messe yt forþe wyþ fat venysoun & fresch motoun. [MS Douce 257]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

frumenty
wheat
seafood
beef
yolks
eggs
saffron


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]

furmente: Frumenty, a kind of porridge made from wheat.
ayren: Eggs. (from German)


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "Recipes from John Crophill's Commonplace Book". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?croph:3>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.

Searchable index of "A Noble Boke off Cookry". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?noble:181>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.

Searchable index of "Ancient Cookery [Arundel 334]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?ancie:167>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.

Searchable index of "Forme of Cury". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?forme:196>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.

Searchable index of "Le Viandier de Taillevent". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?viand:62>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.

Searchable index of "Le Menagier de Paris". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?menag:145>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.

Searchable index of "Le Menagier de Paris". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?menag:440>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.

Searchable index of "Liber cure cocorum [Sloane MS 1986]". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?liber:4>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.

Searchable index of "MS Douce 257". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?douce:1>. Accessed on November 20, 2019, 9:23 am.




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