Electuary of White Sandalwood
Prepared for [event name] on [date]
by [name]


Introduction
This entry is a re-creation of a recipe from An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook (Andalusia, 13th c. - Charles Perry, trans.), entitled "Electuary of White Sandalwood". [insert a brief description of dish here, possibly including any or all of the following: characteristics of the final dish, when or how it might have been served, and why you selected it]


The Source Recipe
The original text of the recipe is as follows:

Electuary of White Sandalwood. Take an ûqiya of white sandalwood and a quarter of an ûqiya of tabashir, pound it all and sift it; add it to a ratl and a quarter of sugar and as much again of rosewater; cook it all until it makes juwarish.



Related Recipes
While interpreting this recipe, I also considered the following recipes that appear to be related:
[edit as appropriate - note that this section should be left out if no related recipes can be found]

98. ELECTUARY OF SOUR CHERRIES FOR SICK PEOPLE WHO HAVE LOST THE DESIRE TO EAT. Take as many sour cherries as you wish and put them in a saucepan upon the fire; and cast them in water by themselves, and let them cook in that water until they turn very tender and appear white; and then throw out that water of theirs in which they cooked; and then take a sieve of very thin horsehair, in which you can strain them, and rub them so much with your hands that everything passes through. Then for each pound of these cherries prepared like this, take half a pound of sugar and mix it in your saucepan on a gentle fire, constantly stirring with a cane until they are cooked; and then put it aside; and put this electuary in a vessel of glazed earthenware, well-stoppered; if you wish, you can put some cloves and a little cinnamon in it. [Libre del Coch]

Electuary (Juwârish) of Mint. Take a ratl of mint, pound it and press out its juice, add a ratl of sugar and a quarter of an ûqiya of mastic and make an electuary. Its benefits: it cuts phlegmatic vomiting, excites the appetite, heats the stomach, and if taken before eating, constipates the intestines; it is useful. [An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook]

Electuary of Cloves. Take two ûqiyas of its flowers and two ratls of sugar dissolved in rosewater; thicken it until it takes the form of a paste and make an electuary, in the form of fingers and tablets. Eat half an ûqiya of it at meals. Its benefits: it excites the appetite, dissolves phlegm, greatly gladdens, increases the force of coitus, and restrains the temperament. [An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook]

Electuary of Musk. Take a mithqâl of musk, half an ûqiya of aloe sticks ["moon wood"], and half an ûqiya each of Chinese laurel and Indian lavender. Pound the medicinal herbs and add them to two ratls of sugar, dissolved in rosewater, and cook it into an electuary. Its benefits: it lightens the spirit and improves the smell of the breath ...[four lines missing]...
a quarter of an ûqiya of ginger and pepper, a quarter of an ûqiya of each, of rue a quarter of an û qiya. Pound all this and add it to two ûqiyas of honey cleaned of its foam. Eat half an ûqiya of it after meals; it excites the meal and digests it, expels gas and dissolves phlegm, aids in dropsy, and provokes urine and menstruation. [An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook]

Electuary of Red Sandalwood. Take three quarters of an ûqiya of red sandalwood, and a quarter of an ûqiya of tabashir (manna sugar). Pound all this and add it to a ratl and a quarter of sugar, dissolved in rosewater. Cook all this until it takes the form of juwarish and take it off the fire. [An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook]

Electuary of 'Ud Qimâri. Take half an ûqiya of it, and of mastic, cinnamon, Chinese cinnamon, half an ûqiya each, two ratls of sugar and two more of rosewater. Put all this on the fire until it makes an electuary. Its benefits: it strengthens the heart and lightens the spirit, digests foods, lightens the body gently, strengthens the liver, dissolves phlegm in various parts of the body, and aids in dropsy. [An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook]

[if desired and applicable, add notes here about significant commonalities or differences between the main recipe and any similar ones]


Materials
The original recipe calls for the following ingredients: [edit this list as appropriate]

sandalwood
sugar
rosewater


[if desired and applicable, add notes here about the ingredients - if any substitutions were made, explain why - also note what quantities were used for each ingredient and, if possible, why]


Procedure
[include a paragraph or two describing the steps taken in preparing the recipe - if applicable, describe any differences between the process in the original source and that used in the re-creation, along with the reason for the deviation]

[add any information about any necessary equipment - if applicable, note when the equipment differed from that used in the medieval period, and explain why the original wasn't used]


Bibliography

[Replace citations with those from books where appropriate and/or possible. Make sure any links work, and that the referenced text is presented accurately]

Searchable index of "An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?anony:543>. Accessed on October 23, 2019, 3:57 am.

Searchable index of "Libre del Coch". Medieval Cookery.
  <http://www.medievalcookery.com/search/display.html?libre:98>. Accessed on October 23, 2019, 3:57 am.




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